Distracted Driving Research Archives | Page 2 of 4 | EndDD

05
May

University of Michigan Study – 90% of Parents Drive Distracted With Children in the Car

May is Global Youth Traffic Safety Month, a month designated to bring awareness to the fact that traffic accidents are the number 1 killer of teens and to get teens involved in the solution. We at EndDD.org know that distracted driving is not just a teen issue. We ask teens, as part of our presentation,

05
May

Evaluating the Effectiveness of Distracted Driving Presentations—Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and EndDD.org

The results of analysis of surveys completed in connection with our pilot program in 2012 have been released in a CHOP Research Institute White Paper dated April 9, 2014, “Evaluation of EndDD.org’s Student Awareness Initiative: Effectiveness of a Program to Prevent Teen Distracted Driving.” […]

24
Jan

The next generation of Audi and Tesla automobiles are about to become more like smartphones on wheels thanks to AT&T

AT&T has long been at the forefront of efforts to reduce distracted driving with its no texting initiatives. Undoubtedly, through it’s leadership, many crashes have been prevented and many lives saved.  So it was with great surprise that I read a January 7, 2014 article in  CNNMoney on a partnership just announced  between AT&T and

11
Oct

VIRGINIA TECH TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE BLOG DRAFT- Fatigue

Distracted driving usually brings images of drivers texting, talking, or tapping a smart phone or other device, not nodding off. Researchers at the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute, however, are telling us fatigue is the leading cause of distracted driving crashes and near-crashes, and these tired-driver crashes are happening ten times more often than was estimated

17
Aug

NATIONAL SAFETY COUNCIL/NATIONWIDE – cell phone use underreported

Cell phone use is responsible for far more distracted driving crashes than are being reported, according to a recent report from the National Safety Council and Nationwide Insurance that says cell phone distracted driving crashes are “vastly under-reported.” The problem is in how data is collected – or not. About one-half of all crashes where